Related to: 'The 100 Kilo Case'

Hachette Books Ireland

Hanging with the Elephant

Michael Harding
Authors:
Michael Harding

In his new book, Hanging with the Elephant, writer Michael Harding is back in Leitrim in the north-west of Ireland. His wife has left for a six-week trip to Poland and he is alone for the first time since his illness two years earlier. Faced with this time on his own, Harding resolves to examine the threat of depression that is a constant presence in his life and his dependency on his wife, the beloved, since his illness. But, as he attempts to tame the 'elephant' - an Asian metaphor for the unruly mind - he finds himself drawn back to the death of his mother during the summer of 2012.Written with unflinching honesty, Hanging with the Elephant begins as one man's quest to overcome his demons, but becomes a journey into the depths of the soul, where we are given a glimpse of the one thing that holds us all.

Hachette Books Ireland

It's Not Yet Dark

Simon Fitzmaurice
Authors:
Simon Fitzmaurice

In 2008, Simon Fitzmaurice was diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease (mnd). He was given four years to live. In 2010, in a state of lung-function collapse, Simon knew with crystal clarity that now was not his time to die. Against all prevailing medical opinion, he chose to ventilate in order to stay alive.Here, the young filmmaker, a husband and father of five small children draws us deeply into his inner world. Told in simply expressed and beautifully stark prose - in the vein of such memoirs as Jean-Dominique Bauby's The Diving Bell and the Butterfly - the result is an astonishing journey into a life which, though brutally compromised, is lived more fully and in the moment than most, revealing at its core the power of love its most potent.Written using an eye-gaze computer, It's Not Yet Dark is an unforgettable book about relationships and family, about what connects and separates us as people and, ultimately, about what it means to be alive.

Hachette Books Ireland

My Whispering Angels

Francesca Brown
Authors:
Francesca Brown

My Whispering Angels is the extraordinary story of an ordinary Irish wife and mother blessed with an incredible gift.Francesca faced the dawn of the new millennium debilitated by ill-health and despair, without any hope or faith in her future. This was until the loving angels and spirits that she remembered watching over her as a young girl returned to save her in adulthood. We are taken on a wondrous journey of self-discovery as Francesca describes how her angels helped her to recover from her illness and lead her to a profound spiritual healing. The angels taught her how to use her gift to help others and to use her insight to guide them to lives enriched with hope and purpose.She describes some of the spirits that aid her in her healing work, such as the beautiful child spirit of Joanna, and relates the messages the angels deliver to her through meditations - messages of hope that relate to the challenges the world faces today.Francesca's remarkable story is a testament to the transformations that can occur if you open your eyes and your heart to hope.

Alan O'Mara

Alan O'Mara is a Gaelic footballer with Cavan and an Ulster u21 champion. In 2013, when he was just twenty-two years of age, he went public about his experience with depression.Since then, Alan has become a leading mental health advocate in Ireland and is an ambassador to the HSE's 'Little Things' campaign and the Gaelic Player's Association.In 2016, Alan founded 'Real Talks' to facilitate discussions on the importance of mental health, effective communication, personal leadership and resilience in schools, the workplace, sports teams and other communities.

Alana Kirk

Alana Kirk is a writer and journalist. She has travelled the world working for charities and writing their stories. When her mum had a devastating stroke just four days after her third baby was born, her life was turned upside down. She began to blog about the struggles of being sandwiched between caring for the two ends of her life - her children and her parents. Over five years later, she is still stuck in the Sandwich Years, but finally found a way to thrive as well as survive. Alana still works for the non-profit sector as well as being a writer, and raising three girls.She is the author of Daughter, Mother, Me.

Brian O'connor

Brian O'Connor is an award-winning journalist who has worked on various national newspapers such as Sunday Tribune, Irish Times and the London Times. He was racing correspondent with the Irish Press for four years and has been racing correspondent with the Irish Times since 1997. Brian is married with two children.

David Moore

David Moore was born in London and reared in Buckinghamshire, England. The child of an Irish mother and jazz-addicted English father, David spent many childhood summers in Ireland. He graduated from Cambridge with first-class honours in English and Dark Age history, and continued his studies at Trinity College Dublin, gaining a masters degree in Anglo-Irish Literature. Entering the world of freelance journalism, his work has appeared in The Irish Times, The Irish Examiner and The Illustrated London News, but like many in his generation, most of his working life has been spent in front of a computer. His employment in the internet industry took him from Clonskeagh to Kansas, where he spent 18 months at Kansas State University as 'our man on the prairie' for his Irish employers. He moved to San Francisco in the middle of the dotcom frenzy, before deciding that he'd never meant to get into technology in the first place. He returned to Ireland to try and figure out what he was meant to get into. He's still not sure, but The Accidental Pilgrim marks one attempt to find out. David Moore recently married, and lives in Dublin.

Deirdre Purcell

Deirdre Purcell was born and brought up in Dublin, and educated there and in a County Mayo convent. Before turning to the writing of fiction, she lived through an eclectic set of careers, including acting, as a member of the permanent company of Ireland`s National Theatre (The Abbey), and journalism for all media - for which she won Ireland's top awards. She has written numerous fiction and non-fiction bestsellers and regularly presents 'What it says in the papers' on RTE's Morning Ireland.

Ferdia Mac Anna

Ferdia Mac Anna is the author of THE LAST OF THE HIGH KINGS, THE SHIP INSPECTOR and BALD HEAD, a memoir of his battle against cancer, which became an Irish bestseller. After an early career as a rock star with his group, Rocky de Valera and the Cowboys, he now works as a radio journalist and screenwriter. Ferdia Mac Anna was the editor of THE PENGUIN BOOK OF IRISH COMIC WRITING (1994).

James Durney

James Durney is a graduate of NUI, Maynooth. He was born in Naas, Co. Kildare, in 1961 and is married with two grown-up children. An award-winning writer, he has written extensively on Irish affairs, including award-winning books on organised crime in America and the Irish revolutionary period. James has also worked on several radio and TV documentaries and was a consultant on TG4's Mobs Mheiriceá (American Mobs).

John Devane

John Devane still practices as a lawyer in his home town of Limerick, Ireland. He is married with a family.

Mary Kennedy

One of Ireland's best-loved broadcasters, Mary Kennedy's career in RTE has spanned more than three decades, including presenting the Eurovision Song Contest in 1995. She is co-presenter of Nationwide and author of the best-selling books What Matters, Lines I Love, Paper Tigers; and Lines for Living. A mum of four, she lives in Dublin.

Michael Harding

Michael Harding is an author and playwright. His creative chronicle of ordinary life in the Irish midlands is published as a weekly column in The Irish Times. He has written numerous plays for the Abbey Theatre, including Una Pooka,Misogynist and Sour Grapes, and has published three novels, Priest, The Trouble with Sarah Gullion and Bird in the Snow as well as three bestselling memoirs, Staring at Lakes, which won three BGE Irish Book awards, Hanging with the Elephant and Talking to Strangers.

Neil Fetherstonhaugh

Neil Fetherstonhaugh was born in Dublin in 1971. After graduating from college in 1990. he worked on a number of local newspapers before leaving to go backpacking in the Middle East, North Africa and across Europe. In 1998 he travelled across the United States, Mexico and central America. Neil returned to Ireland in 1999 and took up a job as a reporter with the Northside People newspaper. Since then he has written two books, and appeared on TV and radio shows. He still travels extensively.

Niall Breslin

Niall Breslin, known as Bressie, is an Irish musician and former Westmeath Gaelic footballer and Leinster rugby player, representing Ireland at Under-21 level in the Rugby World Cup. A native of Mullingar, he attended UCD on a sports scholarship, graduating with a BA in Economics and Sociology.He found success as the lead singer, guitarist and songwriter with pop band The Blizzards, as a co-writer and producer with XIX Entertainment, and as a solo artist and music producer. He was the winning coach on the first and third seasons of The Voice of Ireland.His work in the area of mental health education and empowerment began two years ago, after his own struggles with depression and anxiety led him to open up publicly on the issue. His My1000Hours blog and training initiatives set out to explore positive and proactive ways of improving emotional fitness and managing mental stress, including through exercise, as well as educating young people about the stigma and management of mental health issues.

Philip Nolan

Philip Nolan was born in Dublin in 1963. An award-winning travel writer, he has also worked for most Irish national newspapers, including the Sunday World, Sunday Press, Sunday Tribune and Evening Herald, and was deputy editor of Ireland on Sunday.

Richard Moore

Richard Moore was born in Derry in 1962. At the age of 10 he was blinded after being shot by a British soldier by a rubber bullet. He went on to live an astounding life - father, musician, businessman. He worked in the area of peace and reconciliation during the Northern Ireland peace process, famously meeting and befriending the soldier responsible for his blindness. In 1996 he founded the charity 'Children in Crossfire', which aims to 'make a lasting and significant contribution towards the eradication of poverty' and which helps children all over the world. Richard lives in Northern Ireland with his wife and two daughters.

Roisin Ingle

Roisin Ingle was born in Dublin where she still lives. She works as a columnist and journalist with the Irish Times.

Shane Dunphy

Shane Dunphy worked for fifteen years as a frontline child protection worker in many different parts of Ireland. He now teaches social studies and psychology and is a regular contributor to television and radio programmes on issues of child and family welfare.He is the author of several non-fiction books, including Wednesday's Child and The Boy They Tried to Hide.

Simon Fitzmaurice

Simon Fitzmaurice is an award-winning writer-director. His films have screened at film festivals all over the world and won prizes at home and abroad. He writes regularly for The Irish Times. His short fiction has been shortlisted for the Hennessy Literary Award and his poetry has appeared in the quarterly publication West 47. Simon is currently working on his first feature-length film My Name is Emily. He lives in Greystones, Co. Wicklow, with his wife Ruth and their five children.