Related to: 'Daughter, Mother and Me'

Alan O'Mara

Alan O'Mara is a Gaelic footballer with Cavan and an Ulster u21 champion. In 2013, when he was just twenty-two years of age, he went public about his experience with depression.Since then, Alan has become a leading mental health advocate in Ireland and is an ambassador to the HSE's 'Little Things' campaign and the Gaelic Player's Association.In 2016, Alan founded 'Real Talks' to facilitate discussions on the importance of mental health, effective communication, personal leadership and resilience in schools, the workplace, sports teams and other communities.

Alison Walsh

Alison Walsh has worked in publishing and literary journalism for a number of years. She wrote a popular and humorous column on family life for the Irish Independent for some years, and this was followed by a memoir on motherhood, In My Mother's Shoes, which became a number-one Irish bestseller in 2010. She is a regular contributor to the Sunday Independent books pages. Alison lives in Dublin with her husband and three children.Follow her on Twitter at @authoralison or visit her website at www.alisonwalsh.net

Brian O'connor

Brian O'Connor is an award-winning journalist who has worked on various national newspapers such as Sunday Tribune, Irish Times and the London Times. He was racing correspondent with the Irish Press for four years and has been racing correspondent with the Irish Times since 1997. Brian is married with two children.

Collette Wolfe

Cork born and bred, Collette Wolfe is a mother, grandmother and activist. In 2011, her 18 year-old daughter Leanne took her own life after years of sustained bullying, which she documented in secret diaries, but never told her family about. Since discovering Leanne's diaries, Collette has worked tirelessly to educate young people across Ireland about the issues involved in bullying. She has been outspoken as the mother of a teenager who committed suicide in Ireland's media, appearing on The Late Late Show and Morning Ireland, among other shows. If I Could Hold You Again is her first book.Brian Finnegan is a Dublin-based author, journalist, ghost-writer and editor. His debut novel, The Forced Redundancy Film Club, was a published in 2012, while his follow-up, Knowing Me Knowing You, was released to critical acclaim in 2014. Brian is one of Ireland's foremost ghost-writers, the name behind several bestselling autobiographies for Irish and international celebrities.

David Moore

David Moore was born in London and reared in Buckinghamshire, England. The child of an Irish mother and jazz-addicted English father, David spent many childhood summers in Ireland. He graduated from Cambridge with first-class honours in English and Dark Age history, and continued his studies at Trinity College Dublin, gaining a masters degree in Anglo-Irish Literature. Entering the world of freelance journalism, his work has appeared in The Irish Times, The Irish Examiner and The Illustrated London News, but like many in his generation, most of his working life has been spent in front of a computer. His employment in the internet industry took him from Clonskeagh to Kansas, where he spent 18 months at Kansas State University as 'our man on the prairie' for his Irish employers. He moved to San Francisco in the middle of the dotcom frenzy, before deciding that he'd never meant to get into technology in the first place. He returned to Ireland to try and figure out what he was meant to get into. He's still not sure, but The Accidental Pilgrim marks one attempt to find out. David Moore recently married, and lives in Dublin.

Deirdre Purcell

Deirdre Purcell was born and brought up in Dublin, and educated there and in a County Mayo convent. Before turning to the writing of fiction, she lived through an eclectic set of careers, including acting, as a member of the permanent company of Ireland`s National Theatre (The Abbey), and journalism for all media - for which she won Ireland's top awards. She has written numerous fiction and non-fiction bestsellers and for six years, presented 'What It Says in the Papers' slot for RTE's Morning Ireland programme, leaving in 2018 to concentrate on her writing.

Emily Hourican

Emily Hourican is a journalist and author. She has written features for the Sunday Independent for ten years, as well as Image magazine, Conde Nast Traveler and Woman and Home. She was also editor of The Dubliner Magazine. Emily's first book, a memoir titled How To (Really) Be A Mother was published in 2013. She is also the author of novels The Privileged, White Villa and The Blamed. She lives in Dublin with her family.

Emma Hannigan

Emma Hannigan was the beloved and bestselling author of thirteen novels, including the No.1 bestseller Letters to My Daughters.Her bestselling memoir Talk to the Headscarf was updated and revised as All To Live For: Fighting Cancer. Finding Hope. In 2007 Emma was diagnosed with breast cancer and her eleven-year battle with cancer began. As an ambassador for Breast Cancer Ireland Emma worked to dispel the fears around cancer and spread hope about new treatments. In February 2018 Emma shared that her team of dedicated doctors had exhausted all avenues in terms of her treatment. She launched a social media campaign #HelpEmmaHelpOthers to raise ?100,000 for Breast Cancer Ireland. Two weeks later, shortly before her death, Emma's target had been reached. In the final months of her life, Emma completed her thirteenth novel, The Gift of Friends, sending her acknowledgements to her editor just days before she passed away.

Felicity Hayes-McCoy

Felicity Hayes-McCoy, author of the best-selling Finfarran series, was born in Dublin, Ireland. She studied literature at UCD before moving to England in the 1970s to train as an actress. Her work as a writer ranges from TV and radio drama and documentary, to screenplays, music theatre, memoir and children's books. Her Finfarran novels are widely read on both sides of the Atlantic, and in Australia, and have been translated into six languages. She and her husband, opera director Wilf Judd, live in the West Kerry Gaeltacht and in Bermondsey, London. She blogs about life in both places on her website www.felicityhayesmccoy.co.uk and you can follow her on Twitter @fhayesmccoy and on Facebook at Felicity Hayes-McCoy Author.

Henrietta McKervey

Henrietta McKervey was born in Belfast and now lives in Dublin. She is the author of What Becomes of Us and The Heart of Everything.Violet Hill is her third novel. @hmckervey www.henriettamckervey.com

James Durney

James Durney is a graduate of NUI, Maynooth. He was born in Naas, Co. Kildare, in 1961 and is married with two grown-up children. An award-winning writer, he has written extensively on Irish affairs, including award-winning books on organised crime in America and the Irish revolutionary period. James has also worked on several radio and TV documentaries and was a consultant on TG4's Mobs Mheiriceá (American Mobs).

Jason McAteer

Jason McAteer played Premier League football for Bolton Wanderers, Liverpool FC, Blackburn Rovers, Sunderland AFC and, finally, Tranmere Rovers as player/coach. His international career began with a call for the Republic of Ireland and he went on to win over fifty caps. His goal against Holland, helping Ireland to a play-off which ultimately resulted in their qualification for the 2002 World Cup, has gone down as one of the most memorable moments in Irish footballing history.

Joe Duffy

Broadcaster Joe Duffy is the presenter of Ireland's most popular daily radio show, Liveline, on RTE Radio 1. He also presents Joe Duffy's Spirit Level on RTE television and writes a weekly column for the Irish Mail on Sunday.Born in Dublin's Mountjoy Square and reared in Ballyfermot, his bestselling memoir Just Joe was published in 2010.His interest in researching and writing about the forgotten children killed in 1916 was sparked by an art project he undertook in Easter 2013 for the Jack and Jill Children's Foundation.In 2014 he organised the first national ecumenical service of Reclamation and Remembrance for the children killed in the Easter Rising.Children of the Rising won the National Book Tokens Non-Fiction Book of the Year award at the BGE Irish Book Awards in 2015, and was a No.1 bestseller in Ireland.

John Banville

John Banville is an Irish novelist, an adapter of dramas, and a screenwriter. His novel The Book of Evidence was shortlisted for the Booker Prize and won the Guinness Peat Aviation award in 1989. His fourteenth novel, The Sea, won the Booker Prize in 2005. He has also been awarded the Franz Kafka Prize (2011); the Irish PEN Award (2013); the Austrian State Prize for Literature (2013) and the Prince of Asturias Award (2014). He has published a number of crime novels as Benjamin Black, most featuring Quirke, an Irish pathologist based in Dublin.He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 2007.

Kari Rosvall

Kari Rosvall was born in Norway in 1944, during the Second World War. She grew up and spent her early life in Sweden, and in 1997 moved to Ireland, which she now considers her home, with her husband Sven.

Kate McCabe

Kate McCabe is married with two children and lives in Howth in County Dublin. She is a former journalist and has published several bestselling novels including The Music of Love, The Spanish Letter, The Beach Bar, The Book Club and The Man of Her Dreams. Kate's hobbies include reading, music, travelling and walking along the beach in Howth while she thinks up plots for her stories.

Mary Kennedy

One of Ireland's best-loved broadcasters, Mary Kennedy's career in RTE has spanned more than three decades, including presenting the Eurovision Song Contest in 1995. She is co-presenter of Nationwide and author of the best-selling books What Matters, Lines I Love, Paper Tigers; and Lines for Living. A mum of four, she lives in Dublin.

Melanie Murphy

Melanie Murphy is an award-winning filmmaker and lifestyle YouTuber from Ireland and has reached sixty million people with her videos. Her first book, Fully Functioning Human (Almost) - a memoir full of advice for young people growing up in this digital age - was an Irish bestseller in 2017. If Only, Melanie's debut novel and a long awaited leap into the world of fiction writing, will publish in the summer of 2019.

Michael Clifford

Michael Clifford is Special Correspondent for the Irish Examiner. He has been working in print and broadcast journalism for over twenty years. He is the author of three non-fiction books, including Bertie Ahern and the Drumcondra Mafia (with Shane Coleman) and two crime novels. In 2014, TV3's Tonight with Vincent Browne programme selected him as Journalist of the Year for his coverage of the garda whistleblower story. He was named the newspaper industry's Journalist of the Year in 2016.He lives in Dublin.@mickcliff

Michael Harding

Michael Harding is an author and playwright. His creative chronicle of ordinary life in the Irish midlands is published as a weekly column in The Irish Times. He has written numerous plays for the Abbey Theatre, including Una Pooka,Misogynist and Sour Grapes, and has published three novels, Priest, The Trouble with Sarah Gullion and Bird in the Snow as well as three bestselling memoirs, Staring at Lakes, which won three BGE Irish Book awards, Hanging with the Elephant and Talking to Strangers.