Related to: 'What Matters'

Hachette Books Ireland

Home Thoughts from the Heart

Mary Kennedy
Authors:
Mary Kennedy

'Mary Kennedy's new book is part memoir, part spiritual guide, part self-help book. It's like the gift of a Christmas visit from a friend' RTÉ GuideA sense of home, and of love, is what makes life meaningful for me. I invite you to share in a journey through family, friendship and adventure in the pages of this book, and hope that you will find something here that resonates with you. After all, we're all walking this road through life together -- and that's what makes it worthwhile.Love, MaryIcon of Irish broadcasting Mary Kennedy invites us into her world in this beautiful book of words and pictures, sharing stories from her life at home and abroad, along with favourite recipes that have been handed down the generations. From family weddings and gatherings, and her love of gardening, to the ups and downs of life, and finding meaning in the spiritual, Mary describes her inner world with an intimacy and honesty her readers have come to love.Including musings on the challenges -- and benefits -- of getting older, and how life can make you stumble when you least expect it (just so you can experience what it is to rise again!), Home Thoughts from the Heart is a book to be cherished.

Hachette Books Ireland

Hanging with the Elephant

Michael Harding
Authors:
Michael Harding
Hachette Books Ireland

Growing Up So High

Sean O'Connor
Authors:
Sean O'Connor

Seán O'Connor was born in Francis Street, in the Liberties of Dublin, a neighbourhood famous over the centuries for the sturdy independence of its people.Now, in this evocative and affectionate book, he recollects the unique and colourful district of his childhood: the neighbours who lived there, their traditions, talk and lore, the music and poetry of the laneways and markets.Remembrances of the 1940s classroom, of bird-watching in Phoenix Park, of roaming towards adolescence in the streets of his ancestors are mingled with tales of ancient ghosts and the coming of change to the Liberties.O'Connor, father of the novelist Joseph, tells his story with honesty, warmth and style, and the often wry wit of his home-place. This tenderly written testament of one Liberties boy builds into a vivid and heart-warming picture of his own extended family as part of a proud community and its all-but-vanished way of life.

Hachette Books Ireland

Lines for Living

Mary Kennedy
Authors:
Mary Kennedy

When Mary Kennedy wrote Lines I Love a few years ago, it struck a chord in the hearts of Irish people across the country, quickly becoming a firm favourite with readers. In Lines for Living, Mary expands upon the themes from that bestselling book, once again sharing with us her inner world with a collection of stories and musings about life in all its hues and flavours. This volume is illustrated throughout with new, treasured quotes, of which she remains an avid collector - including some from the many readers who were inspired to write to her. The book weaves gently through the stages of life, covering such varying themes as motherhood and adjusting to the 'empty nest', age and beauty, the healing power of nature, home-making, food and celebrations, community, friendship, spirituality and gardening. Replete with the warmth, honesty and humour we have come to expect from one of Ireland's best-loved broadcasters, Lines for Living is the perfect gift to give or receive, a book to cherish and dip into time and again.

Alan O'Mara

Alan O'Mara is a Gaelic footballer with Cavan and an Ulster u21 champion. In 2013, when he was just twenty-two years of age, he went public about his experience with depression.Since then, Alan has become a leading mental health advocate in Ireland and is an ambassador to the HSE's 'Little Things' campaign and the Gaelic Player's Association.In 2016, Alan founded 'Real Talks' to facilitate discussions on the importance of mental health, effective communication, personal leadership and resilience in schools, the workplace, sports teams and other communities.

Alana Kirk

Alana Kirk is a writer and journalist. She has travelled the world working for charities and writing their stories. When her mum had a devastating stroke just four days after her third baby was born, her life was turned upside down. She began to blog about the struggles of being sandwiched between caring for the two ends of her life - her children and her parents. Over five years later, she is still stuck in the Sandwich Years, but finally found a way to thrive as well as survive. Alana still works for the non-profit sector as well as being a writer, and raising three girls.She is the author of Daughter, Mother, Me.

Brian O'connor

Brian O'Connor is an award-winning journalist who has worked on various national newspapers such as Sunday Tribune, Irish Times and the London Times. He was racing correspondent with the Irish Press for four years and has been racing correspondent with the Irish Times since 1997. Brian is married with two children.

David Moore

David Moore was born in London and reared in Buckinghamshire, England. The child of an Irish mother and jazz-addicted English father, David spent many childhood summers in Ireland. He graduated from Cambridge with first-class honours in English and Dark Age history, and continued his studies at Trinity College Dublin, gaining a masters degree in Anglo-Irish Literature. Entering the world of freelance journalism, his work has appeared in The Irish Times, The Irish Examiner and The Illustrated London News, but like many in his generation, most of his working life has been spent in front of a computer. His employment in the internet industry took him from Clonskeagh to Kansas, where he spent 18 months at Kansas State University as 'our man on the prairie' for his Irish employers. He moved to San Francisco in the middle of the dotcom frenzy, before deciding that he'd never meant to get into technology in the first place. He returned to Ireland to try and figure out what he was meant to get into. He's still not sure, but The Accidental Pilgrim marks one attempt to find out. David Moore recently married, and lives in Dublin.

Deirdre Purcell

Deirdre Purcell was born and brought up in Dublin, and educated there and in a County Mayo convent. Before turning to the writing of fiction, she lived through an eclectic set of careers, including acting, as a member of the permanent company of Ireland`s National Theatre (The Abbey), and journalism for all media - for which she won Ireland's top awards. She has written numerous fiction and non-fiction bestsellers and regularly presents 'What it says in the papers' on RTE's Morning Ireland.

Ferdia Mac Anna

Ferdia Mac Anna is the author of THE LAST OF THE HIGH KINGS, THE SHIP INSPECTOR and BALD HEAD, a memoir of his battle against cancer, which became an Irish bestseller. After an early career as a rock star with his group, Rocky de Valera and the Cowboys, he now works as a radio journalist and screenwriter. Ferdia Mac Anna was the editor of THE PENGUIN BOOK OF IRISH COMIC WRITING (1994).

James Durney

James Durney is a graduate of NUI, Maynooth. He was born in Naas, Co. Kildare, in 1961 and is married with two grown-up children. An award-winning writer, he has written extensively on Irish affairs, including award-winning books on organised crime in America and the Irish revolutionary period. James has also worked on several radio and TV documentaries and was a consultant on TG4's Mobs Mheiriceá (American Mobs).

John Devane

John Devane still practices as a lawyer in his home town of Limerick, Ireland. He is married with a family.

Mary Kennedy

One of Ireland's best-loved broadcasters, Mary Kennedy's career in RTE has spanned more than three decades, including presenting the Eurovision Song Contest in 1995. She is co-presenter of Nationwide and author of the best-selling books What Matters, Lines I Love, Paper Tigers; and Lines for Living. A mum of four, she lives in Dublin.

Michael Harding

Michael Harding is an author and playwright. His creative chronicle of ordinary life in the Irish midlands is published as a weekly column in The Irish Times. He has written numerous plays for the Abbey Theatre, including Una Pooka,Misogynist and Sour Grapes, and has published three novels, Priest, The Trouble with Sarah Gullion and Bird in the Snow as well as three bestselling memoirs, Staring at Lakes, which won three BGE Irish Book awards, Hanging with the Elephant and Talking to Strangers.

Neil Fetherstonhaugh

Neil Fetherstonhaugh was born in Dublin in 1971. After graduating from college in 1990. he worked on a number of local newspapers before leaving to go backpacking in the Middle East, North Africa and across Europe. In 1998 he travelled across the United States, Mexico and central America. Neil returned to Ireland in 1999 and took up a job as a reporter with the Northside People newspaper. Since then he has written two books, and appeared on TV and radio shows. He still travels extensively.

Niall Breslin

Niall Breslin, known as Bressie, is an Irish musician and former Westmeath Gaelic footballer and Leinster rugby player, representing Ireland at Under-21 level in the Rugby World Cup. A native of Mullingar, he attended UCD on a sports scholarship, graduating with a BA in Economics and Sociology.He found success as the lead singer, guitarist and songwriter with pop band The Blizzards, as a co-writer and producer with XIX Entertainment, and as a solo artist and music producer. He was the winning coach on the first and third seasons of The Voice of Ireland.His work in the area of mental health education and empowerment began two years ago, after his own struggles with depression and anxiety led him to open up publicly on the issue. His My1000Hours blog and training initiatives set out to explore positive and proactive ways of improving emotional fitness and managing mental stress, including through exercise, as well as educating young people about the stigma and management of mental health issues.

Philip Nolan

Philip Nolan was born in Dublin in 1963. An award-winning travel writer, he has also worked for most Irish national newspapers, including the Sunday World, Sunday Press, Sunday Tribune and Evening Herald, and was deputy editor of Ireland on Sunday.

Richard Moore

Richard Moore was born in Derry in 1962. At the age of 10 he was blinded after being shot by a British soldier by a rubber bullet. He went on to live an astounding life - father, musician, businessman. He worked in the area of peace and reconciliation during the Northern Ireland peace process, famously meeting and befriending the soldier responsible for his blindness. In 1996 he founded the charity 'Children in Crossfire', which aims to 'make a lasting and significant contribution towards the eradication of poverty' and which helps children all over the world. Richard lives in Northern Ireland with his wife and two daughters.

Roisin Ingle

Roisin Ingle was born in Dublin where she still lives. She works as a columnist and journalist with the Irish Times.

Simon Fitzmaurice

Simon Fitzmaurice is an award-winning writer-director. His films have screened at film festivals all over the world and won prizes at home and abroad. He writes regularly for The Irish Times. His short fiction has been shortlisted for the Hennessy Literary Award and his poetry has appeared in the quarterly publication West 47. Simon is currently working on his first feature-length film My Name is Emily. He lives in Greystones, Co. Wicklow, with his wife Ruth and their five children.