Related to: 'Do You Know Who's Dead?'

Hachette Books Ireland

Time Pieces

John Banville, Paul Joyce
Authors:
John Banville, Paul Joyce
Hachette Books Ireland

Did That Actually Happen?

Paddy Duffy
Authors:
Paddy Duffy

Remember the time Ray Burke had trees planted for a by-election, then uprooted them when he lost? Remember the time Brian Cowen went on radio with a voice like Barry White, leading everyone to think he spent the night before on the black stuff? Or remember the time Pee Flynn told us a story of three house, six-figure woe and asked us all to 'try it some time'?Politics is a strange business at the best of times, but Irish politics seems to have a special kind of strangeness about it, so much so that you often have to wonder, 'Did That Actually Happen?'With characteristic wry humour, columnist and broadcaster Paddy Duffy recounts the ridiculous but true stories that make Irish politics what it is: intriguing, amusing and completely daft as a brush.If you're looking for a book that gets to the heart of our political system and offers solutions for the future, then you're probably in the wrong section. No navel-gazing, just belly-laughing.

Hachette Books Ireland

Triggs: The Autobiography of Roy Keane's dog

Triggs
Authors:
Triggs

Roy Keane was the most controversial footballer of his generation. And the most influential. He captained Manchester United during an era in which they dominated English football. He made friends. He made enemies. He walked out of a World Cup and divided a nation. And his beloved Labrador Retriever Triggs was at his side through it all. Their walks became the stuff of 24-hour, rolling news legend. Now, in the most eagerly awaited football memoir of the decade, Triggs finally reveals the part she played in the extraordinary drama of her master's life.

Arthur Mathews

Arthur Mathews attended the College of Marketing and Design before (eventually) joining the Hot Press Art Department in 1985.After a spell in The Joshua Trio, he began writing for television along with fellow Hot Presser Graham Linehan.Among the shows he has created and/or written are Paris, Toast Of London, Father Ted, Hippies, Big Train, The All New Alexei Sayle Show, Brass Eye, Harry Enfield And Chums, The Fast Show, Black Books, Val Falvey TD and the film Wide Open Spaces.He has written a 'bogus memoir', Well Remembered Days (John Peel's favourite book of all time!), as well as The Craggy Island Parish Newsletters, Father Ted - The Complete Scripts (with Graham Linehan), The Book Of Poor Ould Fellas (with Declan Lynch), Angry Baby, and Toast On Toast.As a cartoonist he contributed 'Charles J. Haughey's Believe It or Not' to Hot Press, 'Doctor Crawshaft's World Of Pop' to the New Musical Express and 'The Chairman' to the Observer Sport Monthly.In the theatre, he created and co-wrote the long running musical I, Keano.On radio he has created and written The Golden Age and Men About The House for BBC Radio 4 and Luneen Live (co-written with Paul Woodfull) for RTÉ.He regards his annual Border Fascist contribution to Hot Press as one of his finest achievements.

Declan Lynch

Declan Lynch began his writing career at the age of seventeen with Ireland's rock and roll magazine Hot Press and now writes for the Sunday Independent. He is the author of several works of fiction and non-fiction, including the acclaimed novel The Rooms, and The Ponzi Man.

Eoghan Corry

Eoghan Corry is a writer and columnist. He is author of eight books onboxing, soccer and GAA history, storylined the GAA museum in Croke Park andis former sports editor of the Sunday Tribune newspaper, MacNamee awardwinner, sports journalist of the year and lecturer on journalism at DIT.

Felicity Hayes-McCoy

Felicity Hayes-McCoy, author of the best-selling Finfarran series, was born in Dublin, Ireland. She studied literature at UCD before moving to England in the 1970s to train as an actress. Her work as a writer ranges from TV and radio drama and documentary, to screenplays, music theatre, memoir and children's books. Her Finfarran novels are widely read on both sides of the Atlantic, and in Australia, and have been translated into six languages. She and her husband, opera director Wilf Judd, live in the West Kerry Gaeltacht and in Bermondsey, London. She blogs about life in both places on her website www.felicityhayesmccoy.co.uk and you can follow her on Twitter @fhayesmccoy and on Facebook at Felicity Hayes-McCoy Author.

John Banville

John Banville is an Irish novelist, an adapter of dramas, and a screenwriter. His novel The Book of Evidence was shortlisted for the Booker Prize and won the Guinness Peat Aviation award in 1989. His fourteenth novel, The Sea, won the Booker Prize in 2005. He has also been awarded the Franz Kafka Prize (2011); the Irish PEN Award (2013); the Austrian State Prize for Literature (2013) and the Prince of Asturias Award (2014). He has published a number of crime novels as Benjamin Black, most featuring Quirke, an Irish pathologist based in Dublin.He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 2007.

Maeve Higgins

Maeve Higgins is a writer and comedian. Originally from Cobh, she now lives in New York City with an unknown number of feisty cockroaches. Together, they're all trying to make it in show-biz! A star in Ireland with two TV shows and two books of essays, We Have A Good Time, Don't We? and Off You Go, under her little belt, Maeve is making her mark on the American comedy scene, winning hearts and laughs with appearances on stage and TV, including Comedy Central's Inside Amy Schumer and National Geographic Channel's Startalk. Maeve says 'yikes!' a lot and always means it.

Michael Clifford

Michael Clifford is Special Correspondent for the Irish Examiner. He has been working in print and broadcast journalism for over twenty years. He is the author of three non-fiction books, including Bertie Ahern and the Drumcondra Mafia (with Shane Coleman) and two crime novels. In 2014, TV3's Tonight with Vincent Browne programme selected him as Journalist of the Year for his coverage of the garda whistleblower story. He was named the newspaper industry's Journalist of the Year in 2016.He lives in Dublin.@mickcliff

Michael Harding

Michael Harding is an author and playwright. His creative chronicle of ordinary life in the Irish midlands is published as a weekly column in The Irish Times. He has written numerous plays for the Abbey Theatre, including Una Pooka,Misogynist and Sour Grapes, and has published three novels, Priest, The Trouble with Sarah Gullion and Bird in the Snow as well as three bestselling memoirs, Staring at Lakes, which won three BGE Irish Book awards, Hanging with the Elephant and Talking to Strangers.

Paddy Duffy

Paddy Duffy is a columnist, broadcaster and TV producer from Donegal, living in London. His debut book, Did That Actually Happen? was published in 2013, the same year he was crowned World Music Quiz Champion - he's equally proud of both achievements. He is a regular contributor to radio and television programmes on the BBC and RTE, has featured in The Huffington Post, The Journal.ie, The Irish Times, the Irish Examiner and most importantly, the Donegal News.He has been a youth worker and mentor for nearly ten years, helping to found SpunOut.ie, working with community projects around Ireland and tutoring political education to the Donegal Youth Council.He's worked on TV shows such as University Challenge and Inside Obama's White House, and is the proud owner of a plate with his name in bold capital letters and M&Ms from the Oval Office.

Paul Joyce

Paul Joyce's debut film, a unique co-operation with the playwright Samuel Beckett, and exhibitions which followed, established him internationally as a film-maker and photographer in the 1980s. He showed at the National Portrait Gallery, the Bibliothèque Nationale and the Witkin Gallery in New York and his documentaries have been nominated both for International Emmy and Cable Ace Awards. Paul as also published two collaborations with David Hockney and is currently Artist in Residence at Eastwell Manor, Kent.

Rob Stears

Rob Stears is an illustrator living in Dublin with his wife and son. He started doodling at an early age and has yet to stop. Why I Love My Mum is his first book. See more at www.robstears.ie

Roisin Ingle

Roisin Ingle was born in Dublin where she still lives. She works as a columnist and journalist with the Irish Times.

Stefanie Preissner

Stefanie Preissner, Munich-born but Mallow-raised, is the creator of hit comedy-drama series Can't Cope, Won't Cope. The show was originally commissioned by RTÉ but since then both seasons have been broadcast on BBC and acquired by Netflix. Why Can't Everything Just Stay the Same?, her first book (published in 2017), was an Irish bestseller and nominated for an Irish Book Award. Can I Say No?, her second book, will publish in the summer of 2019.She has also produced a series of short documentaries, How To Adult, with RTÉ Player.Her one-woman theatre show, Solpadeine Is My Boyfriend, enjoyed sell-out runs in Dublin before touring internationally to Bucharest, Edinburgh and Australia, and - as a radio play - it became RTÉ's most downloaded podcast.Stefanie graduated from University College Cork with a BA in Drama and Theatre Studies and Spanish. Alongside her career as a screenwriter and playwright, she has won several awards as an actor.She is a regular contributor to Ireland's Sunday Independent newspaper and her voice is well-recognised from her prolific voiceover career. She is currently working more projects than she can cope with due to her ongoing battle with people pleasing. She lives in Dublin and on Instagram @stefaniepreissner

Suzanne Behan

Suzanne Behan is the granddaughter of John Walsh otherwise known as the 50 Francis Street Photographer. A keen photographer herself she is in the process of curating the thousands of photographs of Dublin and Ireland which her grandfather took throughout his career, working from his shop on Francis Street. She lives in Kildare.

Tara Flynn

Tara Flynn is from County Cork, which means she is a born expert in the field of Giving Out (Loudly and with Great Authority). Her work has taken her all over the world but she found herself an American husband while she was away so that worked out well.She works as an actress, columnist and improviser and has appeared in hit TV shows such as Stewart Lee's Comedy Vehicle, Irish Pictorial Weekly and Line of Duty. She makes satirical videos (Racist B&B; Armagayddon)whenever she gets cross about inequality. She is the author of the best-selling You're Grand: The Irishwoman's Secret Guide to Life and Giving Out Yards. Tara lives in Dublin with the American Husband.

Twenty Major

Twenty Major was born some years ago in Dublin, Ireland. He lives on, or around, the South Circular Road with a dog called Bastardface and a cat called Throatripper. He spent his formative years on the streets of Dublin playing football, kick the can and robbing blind people with collection tins. After many years of training he became the youngest fully qualified shepherd in Ireland and by the time he was thirty he was a Shepherd Master. His best friend is called Jimmy the Bollix and they drink, on a daily basis, in Ron's bar. He was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 but was beaten to the gong by Bishop Desmond Tutu who ran a vigorous dirty tricks campaign against him. He has never forgiven Tutu and will one day have his revenge. His other mortal enemies include Daryl Hall, LL Cool J (who stole his rap) and any kind of clown. Twenty Major wrote a daily blog at www.twentymajor.net which was amongst the most widely read and popular in Ireland.

Valerie Cox

In a long career as a reporter working in newspapers, radio and television, Valerie Cox has interviewed people from every county in Ireland. Over eleven years working on the Today programme on RTÉ Radio she travelled around the country covering stories as diverse as the closure of schools, Garda stations and post offices. She was out with the rescue services in floods and snow and covered the events that make rural Ireland special, including the ploughing.She is the author of two previous books, Searching, which tells the story of Ireland's missing people, and The Family Courts. Valerie lives in rural County Wicklow with her husband Brian and the couple have five children and four grandchildren.